Order Now
Menu

History Essays

World History

23 Feb 2017

Needless to say, the present is defined by the events of the past and when one will look at the reasons behind the conflict that has been happening in the world we live in today, we only need to look into the past events to see why this is so. When one makes an analysis on how an action event from the 15th to the 19th century contributed to the conflict that is happening now in the current century, one will see that the age of exploration had a lot to do with it. While the age of exploration widened the horizons for many travelers, it also signaled the start of possible conflict between the East and the West.

read more

History: the Creation of Israel

22 Feb 2017

For thousands of years, the small nation of Israel has been the site of countless wars between people who claim, for many different reasons, the land as their own. The struggle persists up to this day, and blood continues to spill over what the world considers its Holy Land. The reasons for generations of bloodshed over the nation of Israel includes Israel’s Biblical past, the diaspora, the homecoming of Jews to Israel, the Holy Wars triggered by the creation of the Israeli state, and the state of Israel in today’s Arabic world.

read more

Pearl Harbor: A Date of Infamy

22 Feb 2017

On December 7, 1941, a date of infamy according to FDR, the Japanese launched an attack on the U.S. naval base in Pearl Harbor on Hawaii’s island of Oahu. The attack destroyed 18 ships and almost 200 planes and caused about 3,700 American casualties. The attack was a complete surprise to the U.S. government, but some historians, especially revisionists, believe that:

read more

Fall of the Roman Empire

20 Feb 2017

To modern eyes and minds, the collapse of the Roman Empire resonates dramatically, illustrating both the efficacy of careful government, as well as the imperial corruption. Although Imperial Rome “fell” in the fifth century A.D., strands of Roman culture endured throughout the Venetian Republic, the Byzantine Empire, and in Western Christendom, which “preferred the Latin language over the vernacular for the next thousand years.” Such a sophisticated and nearly indelible cultural and political behemoth such as the Roman Empire was not brought down by a single, cause; but rather by a collusion of negative influences. Also at play, perhaps, were positive influences of cultural evolution, as this paper will examine. 

read more

Roman Catholicism and Abortion

20 Feb 2017

Religion is an important part of the current abortion debate. The rise of an abortion rights mentality can be regarded, on one level, as an instance of the rapid pace of secularization. On another level, it is part of a much older and long-standing problematic. Some authors regard the rise of an abortion rights mentality as a continuation of the individualism of the Protestant Reformation and an extension of the antitraditionalism of the Enlightenment (Falik 17).

read more

The Success of the Roman Army

20 Feb 2017

The Roman army was considered to be the ultimate fighting machine of the Old World. At full strength, one Roman legion can be made up of over 10,000 men with 4,200 infantry, 4,200 footmen, 600 horsemen and 300 calvary men called the Eques Legionis. Over time, the soldiers serving in the army were composed of Romans and auxiliaries who are soldiers from the allied provinces of the empire (MacMullen 228; Santosuosso 18). The success of the Roman army in conquering the modern world could be attributed to three prime factors: the weaponry used in combat, their military tactics and the frame of mind of the soldiers. This paper will discuss in detail these three factors.

read more

Queen Anne

16 Feb 2017

In any discussion of Queen Anne’s war, it is perhaps best to begin with an understanding of Queen Anne herself. In many ways, it is odd that she would ever have become queen at all. When Anne Stuart was born, her uncle Charles II was King of England. She was the second oldest of the king’s nieces; her sister Mary was the eldest. When Charles II died without heirs, the throne passed to his brother James II. The politics of England were odd at that time and though her parents were Catholic, the bishops of England insisted that Mary and Anne be raised at Protestants, setting Anne at odds with her family over religion. Before their father took the throne of England, James married his eldest daughter off to William of Orange, a Dutch Protestant. Anne was married to Prince George of Denmark in a move many hoped would create an Anglo-Danish alliance against William and the Dutch. The marriage was arranged with assistance from King Louis XIV of France (Blthye, 1998).

read more

Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria: Their Similarities and Differences

16 Feb 2017

Queen Elizabeth has become a legend of monarchy in her own lifetime. She is referred to as the Golden Age of England because it was considered to many as a time of great achievement and prosperity. She is famed by her abilities and achievements as she became a model to her very own people (Robin Chew, 2008).

read more

Queer Theory

16 Feb 2017

The concept of sexuality, what is socially accepted, what is 'natural', what is prescribed by religion, what is deemed deviant has been a form of social analysis, controversy, political debate and a measure of human progress. For what was considered the least talked about issue in society, sexuality was in many ways what defined the individual, their society, culture and the legal and moral laws that presided within it. The controllers of power were white, middle class, heterosexual men. If one of the white, middle to upper class men were found to be practicing homosexuality they were deemed to be under the influence of Satan himself. Homosexuality was in many ways to the hegemonic masculinity an abdication of the throne, stepping down from the privileged class and taking the form of the lower forms of life; women and the lesser races.

read more

History of the railroad

16 Feb 2017

After the American Civil War, railroads became the first really big businesses in the country and though most people associate the concept of the “company store” with mine and mills, the railroads were the first of the companies to try to take back their employees earnings with forced use of facilities owned by the company. The railroads used the fact that they were that nation’s primary source of transportation to blackmail workers into taking pay cuts, doing more work for less money and when the workers tried to do something about it, as with the strike of 1877, enlisting the aid of the military to put down the strikers, killing striking workers, women and children. (Chernesky 2007)

read more

Order your paper now!

I need
My e-mail

EssayLab Reviews

  • Jason (student)

    I asked Essay Lab to write an essay for me and received paper the next day after I ordered it! Thank you!

  • Kimberly (student)

    Awesome WORK! If I ever need to write my essay – I will use only EssayLab!

  • Matt (student)

    These people are lifesavers! Just ask – “write me an essay” and they will start right away!