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Literature Essays

Edgar Allan Poe Poetry Comparison

23 Feb 2017

Very often, literature studies in the primary level always allude to Edgar Allan Poe’s Annabel Lee and The Bells as childhood experiences. Nonetheless, Poe’s life story, undoubtedly often do not mention such experiences in his childhood. Many sources agreed however, that Poe experienced death or loss of the women he cared for in his lifetime. It is safe to conclude then that some of these experiences contributed to and had inspired the contents of his poems and stories.

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“The Fall of the House of Usher”

23 Feb 2017

Edgar Allan Poe’s “Fall of the House of Usher” is narrated in the first person by one of the active participants in the story. The unnamed narrator relates his experience in the house of Roderick Usher who is a descendant of an old family and who believes that the house is contributing to his mental deterioration which is also affected by the eventual decease of his twin sister Madeline. Characteristic of Poe’s writing, we once again go through the experiences of a person’s mind and thought. The difference with the “Fall of the House of Usher” is that we are seeing two minds working at the same time – the mind of the narrator and the mind of Roderick Usher from the perspective of the narrator which may or may not be biased.

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“Mapping vulnerability: disasters, development and peoples”

23 Feb 2017

We often tended to look at the world around us as out birth given gift, a presence that is although unattainable, it is yet in sight for years to come. However, there have been heard constant alarm signals that point out the fact that the world is not only lacking any positive improvement, but has even increased its degree of involution in terms of the natural habitat, the environmental aspect, as well as the human society. As a result, today, we limit our questions to establishing the connections between the natural elements which have been given unaltered, and the human society, that has been on a constant move and change. Greg Bankoff, Georg Frerks, and Dorothea Hilhorst tried in “Mapping vulnerability: disasters, development and peoples” to find a viable connection between these elements and possible answers for questions relating to the degree in which modern society plays a role in defining the future evolution of the world.

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Critical Evaluation (Revelation)

23 Feb 2017

Liz Lochead’s poem entitled Revelation is a genre of fictional-reality where there are intentions of truthful facts and data towards the man named Bob on what he did to the yard. Revelation can be defined as a realization or sudden understanding. The narrator knew that Bob as a good and friendly person because of his innocent face and name, but is actually different from his actions in the yard, which was witnessed by the narrator. The narrator intended to witness the actions of Bob in order to justify the true personality of Bob, which was opposite to his physical characteristics. The poem relies on the uncovering event made by Bob whom to be the “suspect” of the yards terrible situation.

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Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates

22 Feb 2017

If there is one book that has literary critics literally falling over themselves as they try to give their two cents worth about it, it has to be Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road. Written in 1961 it has been hailed as literary gem. But it was not until the late 90s that the book cross to the public domain. Richard Yates brings out his characters in eerily real sense. A simple but devastatingly beautiful prose is employed by Yates. But it did not make the book fly off the shelves, not until after 1999 anyway.

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Paul Jackson's Take on Homosexuality in WWII Canada

22 Feb 2017

North America in the 21st century is open to the idea that gay and lesbian people can be accepted into the mainstream of society. In the present, laws against discrimination consider the rights of homosexual persons. But less than 60 years ago this was not the normal view of society. The most advanced countries in the Western world could not tolerate the existence and practice of homosexuality.

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Revisiting America: Readings in Race, Culture and Conflict

22 Feb 2017

Revisiting America: Readings in Race, Culture and Conflict, by Susan Wyle, is a rhetorical rendition of the American history. The reader, roughly organized chronologically offers insightful reading on a myriad of racial and cultural struggles in the past and present of American history. Chapter 1 called "Early Conflicts on the Eastern Shore," includes readings that range from a scholarly discussion of the Pocahontas myth to the trial testimonies of the Salem Witch Trials, addressing issues of race, gender, slavery, and freedom in colonial America. Chapter 3, "Conflicts on the Way West," includes a wide variety of primary and secondary sources dealing with the racial, social, and gender -based conflicts experienced by the men and women who traveled west. The next chapter, "Slavery and the Civil War," examines the experiences of slaves and freedmen, soldiers and women, politicians and writers who participated in many different aspects of the Civil War.

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A Rose for Emily, a Short Story by William Faulkner

22 Feb 2017

The story, A Rose for Emily, is fictional in terms of characters but the setting of the plot is very similar to where the author grew up. The author's background of belonging to an esteemed family of veteran heroes most probably contributed to the development of the characters of Miss Emily, Judge Stevens and Col. Sartoris. Knowing that William Faulkner attempted to make a saga out of the life of certain fictional characters from his other novels make it easy to understand why he incorporated some seemingly irrelevant people like Col. Sartoris in the story.

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Jack London’s The Call of the Wilde

22 Feb 2017

1.What is Bucks life like at the judge’s home? Buck was treated warmly. He was well loved by the family members of the judge, including the children and the grandchildren. There was no scarcity in food, and he was well cared for by the people in the estate.
2. Why does the stranger lie to the baggageman on the train and say that the dog has fits? The stranger had to lie, primarily because Buck was kidnapped. In addition to this, denying the real status of the dog would prevent further questions to be raised.
3. How does the man in the red sweater train Buck? The man treated Buck harshly. From the lavish life that Buck had in the Judge’s house, Buck was beaten and abused. After being hurt, the man gave warnings that he would be beaten again once he tries to show rage and anger before being sumptuous food.
4. How has Bucks life changed in this chapter? Buck’s life definitely changed in this chapter. From having a pampered life in the home of the Judge, Buck had to face the harsh realities that he did not know about.

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The First Time I Lived In an Apartment: A Personal Rite of Passage

21 Feb 2017

Eduard Lindeman (1921) once said that civilization is marked by the need of mankind to establish good human relationships (1). He stated, “Man is destined by nature and by environment to live in cooperation with his fellow-men” (Lindeman 1921, 1). This forms culture and social organization, as it brings about cordial relationships between its members for the sake of harmony, perpetuation, and self-preservation. To mark the existence of this state of reality, French anthropologist Charles-Arnold van Gennep (1873-1957) insisted that there are certain ‘rites’ that highlight changes during a particular stage of a lifetime, especially during special episodes (i.e., birth, puberty, marriage, parenthood, death) that appear to be almost constant whatever culture or race they may be under. These are what he called ‘rites of passage’, which points to a certain flow of events and changes, which cover distinct and similar features that are marked by culturally defined biological and social phases: (1) separation, (2) transition, and (3) re-incorporation (Goggins II 2004, 4).

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